UNA REY | David Brooks and Darren Jorgenson, The Wanarn Painters of Place and Time: Old Age Travels in the Tjukurrpa

The Aboriginal painting movement has long been characterised by ‘remote stars’ whose seniority connotes the last generation to embody the full lexicon of pre-contact experience of language, law (tjukurrpa) and Country. Witness, for example, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, whose career—launched in her eighties—was

UNA REY | David Brooks and Darren Jorgenson, The Wanarn Painters of Place and Time: Old Age Travels in the Tjukurrpa

The Aboriginal painting movement has long been characterised by ‘remote stars’ whose seniority connotes the last generation to embody the full lexicon of pre-contact experience of language, law (tjukurrpa) and Country. Witness, for example, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, whose career—launched in her eighties—was

GRACE BLAKELEY-CARROLL | Sheridan Palmer, Hegel’s Owl—The Life of Bernard Smith

‘When philosophy paints its grey in grey, then has the shape of life grown old… The owl of Minerva spreads its wings only with the falling of dusk.’ – G.W.F. Hegel Download PDF (0.14MB)

GRACE BLAKELEY-CARROLL | Sheridan Palmer, Hegel’s Owl—The Life of Bernard Smith

‘When philosophy paints its grey in grey, then has the shape of life grown old… The owl of Minerva spreads its wings only with the falling of dusk.’ – G.W.F. Hegel Download PDF (0.14MB)

KATE WARREN | Critical Wonder: Lynette Wallworth’s art in the age of spectacle and socially engaged practice

In contemporary art theory, much has been written about collaborative and socially engaged artistic practices, and their relationship to spectacle. The use of spectacle in contemporary art is frequently viewed pejoratively, connoting a waning of critical potential and the pacification

KATE WARREN | Critical Wonder: Lynette Wallworth’s art in the age of spectacle and socially engaged practice

In contemporary art theory, much has been written about collaborative and socially engaged artistic practices, and their relationship to spectacle. The use of spectacle in contemporary art is frequently viewed pejoratively, connoting a waning of critical potential and the pacification

ALICE-ANNE PSALTIS | Artpolitical Environment: Richard Bell and Emory Douglas’s Burnett Lane Mural

Black activists have long crafted systems of identification that intersect politics and aesthetics as a means of promoting social change for oppressed communities around the world. This article uses the global history of black political aesthetics as a framework for

ALICE-ANNE PSALTIS | Artpolitical Environment: Richard Bell and Emory Douglas’s Burnett Lane Mural

Black activists have long crafted systems of identification that intersect politics and aesthetics as a means of promoting social change for oppressed communities around the world. This article uses the global history of black political aesthetics as a framework for

SIMON PIERSE | Alannah Coleman: 1970—A Year at Bonython’s Sydney Gallery

When art dealer and entrepreneur Kym Bonython’s new gallery opened in Sydney in 1967, it was believed to be the largest commercial gallery in the southern hemisphere. In early 1970, Bonython brought Melbourne-born art dealer Alannah Coleman over from London

SIMON PIERSE | Alannah Coleman: 1970—A Year at Bonython’s Sydney Gallery

When art dealer and entrepreneur Kym Bonython’s new gallery opened in Sydney in 1967, it was believed to be the largest commercial gallery in the southern hemisphere. In early 1970, Bonython brought Melbourne-born art dealer Alannah Coleman over from London

ANNA PARLANE | The tip of the iceberg: Michael Stevenson’s A Life of Crudity, Vulgarity, and Blindness, 2012, and perceptual occlusion in contemporary culture

Michael Stevenson’s A Life of Crudity, Vulgarity, and Blindness, 2012, an installation at Frankfurt’s Portikus, remains one of the artist’s most poetic works. Continuing Stevenson’s long-running investigation into politics in the margins of imperial power, A Life of Crudity is one of a

ANNA PARLANE | The tip of the iceberg: Michael Stevenson’s A Life of Crudity, Vulgarity, and Blindness, 2012, and perceptual occlusion in contemporary culture

Michael Stevenson’s A Life of Crudity, Vulgarity, and Blindness, 2012, an installation at Frankfurt’s Portikus, remains one of the artist’s most poetic works. Continuing Stevenson’s long-running investigation into politics in the margins of imperial power, A Life of Crudity is one of a